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Welcome to Ballinrobe Community School

Welcome to Ballinrobe Community School’s website, I hope you find it informative and that it will provide you with a sense of the school and its ethos. The school opened its doors in September 1990 as a result of the amalgamation of the three second level schools in the town. Since then we have welcomed the students from the surrounding area and endeavoured to ensure that each one of them leaves school as a confident, mature and resilient young adult, equipped to deal with the challenges ahead.

Our Mission Statement encompasses the values of respect, inclusion and care. These are evident in the warm and welcoming atmosphere in the school where positive relationships ensure that students can develop in a safe and caring environment.

We have gained a reputation as a progressive school, constantly evolving to improve the student experience. We are very proud of our academic record and each year celebrate the successes of our students. We are cognisant of each student’s ability and context but set high expectations for all students and ensure that they achieve their potential with the support of a dedicated and hardworking teaching staff. We offer students a comprehensive range of subjects through our wide curriculum at both Junior and Senior levels

We have a very dedicated staff, freely giving their time to offer a wide range of extra-curricular activities; students are encouraged to be actively involved as we believe their participation provides them with a real sense of belonging and affords further opportunities for growth as individuals.

As Principal, I am very proud of the efforts and achievements of all at Ballinrobe Community School, the students, the teaching and ancillary staff all working together in an atmosphere of respect. I am dedicated to maintaining and improving every aspect of this school.

William Culkeen
Principal

Our Latest News

A wonderful tribute to Gerry.And, just like that, without a word of warning, Gerry Fahy is gone: a man who was a central part of so many great moments in the life of Ballinrobe over the past 40 years.I remember when he arrived as a teacher in Ballinrobe CBS in the early 1980s - a Tuam sham, a bundle of energy, full of devilment, and larger than life, paradoxical though that may seem because he was no six footer.We were all young and silly - the enduring prerogative of the early teen - but Gerry had us well sussed. He was an excellent teacher, even for those of us devoid of any obvious facility in the broad field of 'numbers and sums'. If the way of the abacus happened to be your calling, Gerry was a godsend, and I recall someone remarking a few years ago on the number of his students who went on to study Accountancy and related disciplines.Outside the classroom, it was the football. That was it. And it was here that the essential magnetism of Gerry's personality manifested itself. He matched our enthusiasm for the game: he just loved it, the possibility it offered for pulling something out of the bag. He wasn't one to pull rank, it was never master and pupil - instead, there was a feeling that we were all exploring together, figuring out how to construct an attack or hoodwink a looming opponent. And if some harmless subterfuge was required - a venial rather than a mortal sin - none of us found Gerry to be too precious about the matter...Teachers like Gerry are important figures in our lives. They draw the veil back on the arcane mysteries of adulthood and allow us a peek in. Gerry certainly did that for us: on the football field, he treated us as equals.In 1985, we won the Flanagan Cup with Gerry the main man. He loved the buzz of the big day. What few student-teacher barriers lingered were completely removed on those occasions: we were co-conspirators embarking on a joint mission. He always had a bounce in his step but on days like that he soared even higher. "Fly like a butterfly, sting like a bee" wasn't his creation, obviously, but it was a phrase he loved to deploy.That was his first big win in Ballinrobe. Later, he joined the staff of the new Ballinrobe Community School and it was here he really came into his own. I reported for the Western People from 1986 to 1995 and encountered Gerry on the sideline, in the school corridor and in various other settings: he could brighten the darkest of days. By the by, I actually bumped into Gerry and his wife, Monica, on holidays on a Balaeric island some years later and we had great fun. Attempting to mount a recalcitrant banana boat bopping around the bay offered a fresh opportunity to, er, bond. Who dares to speak of Sixmilebridge 1991, when the school captured the All-Ireland Senior B crown in the very first year of its existence? This was one of nine All-Irelands - male and female - the school would win in the 1990s. Sixmilebridge was one of the great days. The team played brilliantly in the second-half to deny St Paul's of Waterford. When they returned to Ballinrobe that night, a wall of people met the bus at the Lakeland Hotel (now the Railway). The town had never seen a night like it before.Martin Murphy and I shot a video of the day - and I mean the whole day, from capturing the team departing on the bus for Sixmilebridge, through a ramble around the town to meet various supporters getting ready for the trip, onto the game itself, the homecoming, and a late-night, emotional and tired, final interview in a disused Cummins' building beside Flannery's with a few players, and Gerry.He had the last word on the day. It was appropriate. He wasn't the only one who helped that team to win that wonderful All-Ireland, but his stamp was all over it. His pulsing energy coursed through the entire enterprise. They played with abandon, they persisted with the task even when it seemed grim and they celebrated with gusto: just as Gerry would have wanted it.I haven't mentioned the laugh yet. It would be an unforgiveable omission to overlook it. Gerry and his laugh were indivisible. It had a rat-a-tat-tat quality: a rapid, intense burst of gunfire. It allowed him to enjoy a moment on its own merits and also to buy time as he conjured up his next contribution, particularly if said contribution involved countering something you had just said.Yes, of course, he was a smartass. A Tuam sham, I said. But an inclusive, not destructive, one. It was a pleasure, not a pain, to take delivery of one of his quips.And when he left you, and went to the next person or group, you'd hear the laugh rise up again. It was an ever-present part of his make up.Gerry was in Croke Park in 2017 when the school defeated St Ciaran's of Ballygawley to capture their third All-Ireland Senior B title. Retired now, but as boyish as ever - giddy as a 13 year-old released on a school tour to the Spring Show: he could never resist a bit of crack. But he was acutely aware of the significance of the occasion and took great pride in it: any time you met him, or spoke with him on the phone, he asked after pupils he had taught or teachers with whom he had soldiered. The pioneering men and women of 1990 had created the foundation for that day, and so many other memorable days over the years.He rang me the night after my mother died in January. My father and he were teaching colleagues in the CBS and the Community School and were very friendly with each other. He was always caring and thoughtful. He was in good form: the same Gerry. He'd had some health problems but nothing to cause any major alarm, I felt. The news of his sudden passing this week took everyone by surprise. We were all the better for knowing him and for having him in our lives. They'll celebrate his life and lay him to rest in Tuam today and we can't be there, though we'd dearly love to be: rip.ie/death-notice/gerry-fahy-tuam-galway/455579 In other times, it would have been a gathering of the clans almost like none before. But we will all remember him fondly.Deepest sympathy to Monica, daughter Deirdre, son-in-law Declan, grandchildren Dylan, Faye and Laoise, his brothers Frank, Pat and Kieran, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nephews, nieces, relatives, neighbours, and friends. And to the teaching staff of Ballinrobe Community School who also loved him dearly. They missed him when he retired and they'll miss him even more now. ...
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30 years ago today: Official Opening of our school. ...
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WINNERS: Congratulations to our three Transition Year students Katie Fraser, Siobhan McGrath, and Tamara Schulte who have followed up their achievements at the BT Young Scientist by winning first prize in the Mozilla (Mozilla Firefox) Mozfest Youth Zone Hackathon for their Defibrillator Finder App . They have won a cash prize and can now add a world title to their many amazing achievements to date. The Youth Zone Hackathon is a free event where young creators and makers can design an idea or prototype and compete for awesome prizes. Throughout the event, you'll have an opportunity to learn new skills and technology while being supported by MozFest Wranglers, Industry Volunteers, and Tech Professionals! ti.to/Mozilla/youth-zone-hackathon/en www.mozillafestival.org/en/spaces/youth-zone/ www.facebook.com/DefibrillatorFinderBallinrobe ...
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